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Toi Gallery Blog

The Story Behind the Image: Tree by Eleonora Arroyo

The Story Behind the Image: Tree by Eleonora Arroyo

Pablo Picasso once said: "Every now and then one paints a picture that seems to have opened a door and serves as a stepping stone to other things."

We want to peek through the door and see what’s behind the image. We asked Toi’s artists to tell us the story behind the picture, what motivated it, what ideas or events produced it. Because every representation has it’s own story, it’s own world for us to discover. 

Eleonora Arroyo. Toi art gallery

http://bit.ly/29ojhsz

This is what Eleonora told us:

During a trip to Mexico for the presentation of a book fair in Guadalajara (at the Guadalajara Book Fair), I was asked to design a poster for the reading campaign for CONACULTA, (Mexico’s National Council for Culture and Arts) and I got to spend a few days in Oaxaca. The whole city is like a great folk art market. I was delighted. Among such wonderful things I’ve found the “alebrijes” those brightly colored Oaxacan-Mexican folk art sculptures of fantastical creatures. One day, I visited the Museum of Popular Art in Mexico City. Upon entering, the first thing I saw was a giant Tree of Life in the garden, it was spectacular!

And just like that, I’ve got the idea for the National Council’s reading campaign: it would represent different alebrijes reading on the top of a tree.

The poster was ready! When I got home and started to work on that, it didn't take me too long, I had it all in my mind, waiting to happen.

The Story Behind the Image. eleonora arroyo. toi art gallery blog.

eleonora arroyo toi art gallery blog 

eleonora arroyo toi art gallery prints 

 

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The Story Behind the Image: Sylvie Bello's "Like a True Home"

The Story Behind the Image: Sylvie Bello's

Pablo Picasso once said: "Every now and then one paints a picture that seems to have opened a door and serves as a stepping stone to other things."

We want to peek through the door and see what’s behind the image. We asked Toi’s artists to tell us the story behind the picture, what motivated it, what ideas or events produced it. Because every representation has it’s own story, it’s own world for us to discover. 

blog toi art gallery prints

http://bit.ly/2boaJ3l

*****

This is what Sylvie told us about her artwork "Like a True Home" 

Everyday on my way to work I used to see this lady next to the bus terminal 810 in Rome, at Teatro Marcello. Her name was Alice.

toi art gallery prints blog

http://bit.ly/2crIhBt

At the beginning I didn’t see her very often, but then over time she used to sit in the terminal plaza everyday. She always carried around a big cart filled with buckets, one chair and all kind of papers and bags covered with sheets.

toi art gallery prints for sale

http://bit.ly/1U7bnoB

I thought It was very intriguing ... Alice lived on the streets, but for some reason she gave me the impression of a person living in a house.

toi art gallery prints for sale 

Sometimes I saw her sitting down, watching the people walking by, as if she was watching TV. Other times I saw her sleeping on a chaise-longe chair as if she was enjoying herself, relaxing on the terrace of a beautiful garden.

Sometimes it seemed to me that she was very busy, cleaning her home. I could tell that, for her, her cart was her little universe, and everything had its particular place in it.

Every morning I’ve got to the station and looked for her, she became an inspiration. She made me wonder about her story, how was her life like before? That, I didn’t know, but I decided to draw her, so others can see her too.

toi art gallery prints for sale

http://bit.ly/2bRFRXv

 

toi art gallery prints for sale

toi art gallery prints

 

 

 

 

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Artists in Motion: María Elina "I always work around the same idea which intrigues me, which is how the fragile and the bestial could share the same scene."

Artists in Motion: María Elina

Artists in Motion aims to introduce you to our artists and their worlds; to allow you a glimpse of their sensibilities and unique perspectives, and the ideas, experiences, people, and places that help inspire their work. Through this series, we hope to give you an idea of how our artists create meaning through the unique works of art that you will take home.

María Elina

toi art gallery art for sale maria elina

How did you start drawing?

I think I always drew but it took quite some time for me to realize that this could be my career. My studies were always related to the visual arts, I studied Image and Sound Design, did photography workshops, illustration, and worked in scenography. In this way, I gradually got closer to what I really wanted to do, which is drawing. For me, painting is a journey. I also attended Diana Aisenberg's workshop and that was a very interesting starting point.

maria elina artists in motion toi art gallery blog

In your work there is a special attention to animals, why?

Books about animals, photography and botany have always been part of my family library since childhood. When working on something, I think there is no way for me to escape those memories. The animals in my drawings have a significant presence, next to the feminine universe and the vegetal kingdom. I always work around the same idea which intrigues me, which is how the fragile and the bestial could share the same scene. The fantastic world of fables had an important place in my childhood, specially the way they personify wild animals metamorphosed with the female body. With that in mind I'm looking for a disturbing result. I think I can get close to that when I combine the delicate and the brutal.

http://bit.ly/2b6qhdm

 

Why did you choose working on children’s books?

One day, when I still was unsure of how to transform my passion in a way to make a living, I went into a bookstore and while looking at children's books I realized that this could be a way for me to develop my work, until then I used to draw only for myself. That day I decided to look for illustration workshops and started attending to each one I could. Creating, for me is as important as looking at what others do, here and everywhere in the world. This helps to become aware of how my own work develops, and be aware of others' work helps and enriches my own. Clearly I decided I wanted to illustrate books but that only addresses my work in one sense, I've also found a lot of other ways to develop my work in this profession that surprised me. All the time new possibilities open up for illustration; its a very large and diverse market.

toi art gallery prints blog maria elina

What do you want to communicate in your work?

It is difficult to answer that because I think there is not something specific I want to convey. If I have to say something, it would be that every work has an intention to disturb, there is no way I can know if it really happens, and I think it does not matter too much, it is a simply a ludic process.

http://bit.ly/2aY4JO3

 What books did you read when you were a child?

In my house there were many books, and I read them all, but I think what was most significant were the photo magazine collection that belonged to my grandfather. He was a photographer. It was a great collection and I saw every magazine a million times: portraits , animals , landscapes abstract images, almost all in black and white. It turned out to be really hypnotic images for me. Today I have those magazines in my house, I think I know them by heart!

maria elina mendez toi art gallery blog

How do you relate words and images in your books?

I can tell you what I would like to happen. I don't believe there is a literal relationship, I would like illustrations to transmit their own authorial mark, and I understand this as personal utterance. This is a kind of guide I try not to avert.

Why is art important for children?

As a child I was, I can say that art always occupied a central place in my life, both as the pleasure of observing and enjoying the creative process. When I was 4 years old I attended the Vocational Institute of Art preschool and I remember absolutely everything I did there. My teachers faces , puppets, paintings and games, that short experience enhanced my creative curiosity in a decisive way and artistic activity was in me forever linked to experimenting and enjoying. In my personal experience , art positively transformed my life making it much happier.

http://bit.ly/2aVQUUB

What does influence your work?

Life! What I see, what I hear, what I fell, my kids, love… the list is endless.

http://bit.ly/2bbJoQa

What legacy does art transmit to kids?

Perhaps, in my humble opinion,, art provides us with a more sensitive perspective about the world and that makes us better.

http://bit.ly/2aJJIKF

What would you say to young artists? 

What works for me is to feel good about what I do, draw more and more , enjoy the process. Not to take too seriously small findings, because everything is very dynamic ... I think enjoying the task is the most important part of the profession.

toi art gallery prints maria elina artists in motion blog

 

http://bit.ly/2aObFAm

http://bit.ly/2bsPa0T

 

  

                                                                                                        Karina Miller 

 

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Animated Sunday: Rosalie Benevello's paper-cut hallucination. Watch the film here!

Animated Sunday: Rosalie Benevello's paper-cut hallucination. Watch the film here!

"Animation is a open-minded domain if we have the courage or the chance  to get out from the rules imposed by animation studios. It is possible to experiment a lot of new story-telling and graphic ways."

About Narcose `a l'azote, animated short film by Rosalie Benevello

According to the definition, Narcosis it’s a reversible alteration of consciousness that happens while diving at depth. It is caused by the anesthetic effect of certain gases at high pressure.  Narcosis produces a state similar to drunkenness and results in relief of anxiety – a feeling of tranquility and mastery of the environment. 

Toi art gallery blog Animated Sunday Rosalie Benevello

There is a strange analogy between narcosis and Rosaline’s short film: we, the viewers, feel also this alteration in the perception of things.

Toi art gallery blog Animated Sunday Rosalie Benevello

We are brought also into the deep ocean and we start to notice ourselves differently. We giggle when looking at our hands and the coral, play with the little fish made of wrapping paper, intoxicated and moved by the magic of Rosaline’s art. 

Rosalie Benevello's film reminds us of Jacques Cousteau's said: "The sea, once it casts its spell, holds one in its net of wonder forever."

 

toi art gallery blog Rosallie Benevello Animated Sunday

This is what Rosalie told us about her work: 

1. Tell us about what inspired you to make this movie

Sometimes in Summer, my brother and I go to Nice in the South of France. Our adopted grand father who live there was a passionate scuba diver in his early years, and his diving stories make me want to see the sea floor. My first diving staggered me. Since I practice scuba diving whenever I can!

Divers on the dive boat tell a lot of stories. I heard one day a story about the nitrogen narcosis phenomenon. Exhilaration, extreme anxiety, hallucination, impairment of judgement, multi-tasking and coordination, loss of decision-making ability and focus, visual or auditory disturbances are some symptoms the scuba diver might experience during the nitrogen narcosis. From that point, I began to research about this phenomenon. I read several writings from the captain Cousteau, I searched on internet to find some analysis reports and testimonies, I saw films about diving ( "Le monde du silence" Jacques Yves Cousteau and Louis Malle, "Le grand bleu" Luc Besson, ...), I heard radio programs from France Inter, I read the book "Narcoses" from Francis le Guen,...

With all this experiences and knowledges about the nitrogen narcosis I naturally wished to make a film about it! 

toi art gallery animated sunday blog

 

2. Why did you choose paper-cut as a form of expression? are you a paper-cut artists? 

I use often paper in my works, I particularly appreciate this material. There are many ways to use it : cut, tear, burn, crease, ... In cardboard form, papier-maché, tracing paper, ...

I challenged and constrain myself to get out of my confort zone, in order to not get bored in my work. For this film my challenge was to use a 2D material (paper cut) and to recreate the sensation of depth specific of the sea underwater directly under camera. 
 
I would not describe myself as a paper-cut artist. I feel me more like a young director who takes her inspiration in artists using paper in their work.  Peter Clark, Jayme McGowan, Peter Callesen, Lisa Nilsson, Elsa Mora, Youri Norstein, Kangmin Kim are the last artists who influence my work.
toi art gallery blog animated sunday
 
3. Why are you interested in animation?
 
I am interested by many means of expressions used in animation : writing, story-telling, staging, directing, animated pictures, sound design, music,... 
As a child I told myself a lot of stories, I collected objects or materials to create imaginary worlds. It's reveal my directing approach. 
 
Animation is a open-minded domain if we have the courage or the chance  to get out from the rules imposed by animation studios. It is possible to experiment a lot of new story-telling and graphic ways. If I renew myself in my work I think I will never be bored with animation. In parallel I have other projects : illustration, graphism, little video games, jewelry creation,... I am curious in all aspects of art, maybe tomorrow I will find another means of expression more appropriate for me!
toi art gallery blog animated sunday
toi art gallery blog animated sunday
4. Where is home?

It's a difficult question. I'm 21 and for the moment I haven't establish a « home ». I like to see new landscapes, to change locations and travel. But right now the place I feel me home is the hammock in my garden!

 

                                                                                                                 Karina Miller

 

 

During a dive in the sea, a diver will suffer a nitrogen narcosis , a phenomenon known as narcosis .
Film end of the 2nd year, EMCA 2016
Turning to Dynamotion , paper cut on multiplane.

leave us a comment! we'd love to hear your thoughts :)


 

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The Story Behind the image: Cherry Trees by Evelyn Daviddi

The Story Behind the image: Cherry Trees by Evelyn Daviddi

Pablo Picasso once said: "Every now and then one paints a picture that seems to have opened a door and serves as a stepping stone to other things."

We want to peek through the door and see what’s behind the image. We asked Toi’s artists to tell us the story behind the picture, what motivated it, what ideas or events produced it. Because every representation has it’s own story, it’s own world for us to discover. 

http://www.toiartgallery.com/collections/evelyn-daviddi

http://www.toiartgallery.com/collections/evelyn-daviddi

This is what Evelyn told us:

 This illustration was inspired by Love Poem XIV by the chilean poet Pablo Neruda.

I read his words and I feel the unconditional love, the poignant love that makes you shake your legs and sigh with melancholy.

Here it is, as translated by W. S. Merwin:

Every day you play with the light of the universe.
Subtle visitor, you arrive in the flower and the water.
You are more than this white head that I hold tightly
as a cluster of fruit, every day, between my hands.

You are like nobody since I love you.
Let me spread you out among yellow garlands.
Who writes your name in letters of smoke among the stars of the south?
Oh let me remember you as you were before you existed.

Suddenly the wind howls and bangs at my shut window.
The sky is a net crammed with shadowy fish.
Here all the winds let go sooner or later, all of them.
The rain takes off her clothes.

The birds go by, fleeing.
The wind. The wind.
I can contend only against the power of men.
The storm whirls dark leaves
and turns loose all the boats that were moored last night to the sky.

You are here. Oh, you do not run away.
You will answer me to the last cry.
Cling to me as though you were frightened.
Even so, at one time a strange shadow ran through your eyes.

Now, now too, little one, you bring me honeysuckle,
and even your breasts smell of it.
While the sad wind goes slaughtering butterflies
I love you, and my happiness bites the plum of your mouth.

How you must have suffered getting accustomed to me,
my savage, solitary soul, my name that sends them all running.
So many times we have seen the morning star burn, kissing our eyes,
and over our heads the gray light unwind in turning fans.

My words rained over you, stroking you.
A long time I have loved the sunned mother-of-pearl of your body.
I go so far as to think that you own the universe.
I will bring you happy flowers from the mountains, bluebells,
dark hazels, and rustic baskets of kisses.

I want
to do with you what spring does with the cherry trees.

 http://www.toiartgallery.com/collections/evelyn-daviddi/products/talking-eyes

want to see more of Evelyn's wonderful fine art prints? go to:  http://bit.ly/1YglOGp

 

 

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The Story behind the image: "Act 4" by Karina Cocq

The Story behind the image:

Pablo Picasso once said: "Every now and then one paints a picture that seems to have opened a door and serves as a stepping stone to other things."

We want to peek through the door and see what’s behind the image. We asked Toi’s artists to tell us the story behind the picture, what motivated it, what ideas or events produced it. Because every representation has it’s own story, it’s own world for us to discover. 

Artistic background:

Karina’s work is magical and whimsical, colorful and playful; but is certainly not about fairies and princesses. Her stories speak of struggle and challenges, injustice, indifference for others, memory and truth. She illustrated the first feminist short story book in Chile “Colorina Colorada yo no quiero ser un hada” [http://www.pikaramagazine.com/2012/06/karina-cocq-ilustradora-%E2%80%9Clas-mujeres-que-retrato-no-quieren-ser-bellas-y-rivales-son-libres-y-se-entienden%E2%80%9D/]. Her images break with women’s stereotypes picturing them as family leaders and powerful characters in the struggle for justice, happiness and shelter.

Karina Cocq Toi Art Gallery Blog Act 4 

http://bit.ly/29QIqMB

This is what Karina told us about her artwork:

Act 4 is part of a series called Dark Skin and is the story of a Chilean farm worker woman, based on the life of my maternal grandmother. This illustration shows a family moving from island to island and looking for a new place to settle down and find a new home. In my artwork I represented them traveling over the coffin of his dead father, which in turn is driven by a red fish. This symbolizes the strength of the earth, which is what guides these robust and magical mothers. I tried to represent that point of drifting without any more tools than hope and determination.

http://bit.ly/2ahl0B1

http://bit.ly/2a64By8

http://bit.ly/29QJbW6

 

 

 

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Artists in Motion: Lucila Biscione and The Art of Detail.

Artists in Motion: Lucila Biscione and The Art of Detail.

Artists in Motion aims to introduce you to our artists and their worlds; to allow you a glimpse of their sensibilities and unique perspectives, and the ideas, experiences, people, and places that help inspire their work. Through this series, we hope to give you an idea of how our artists create meaning through the unique works of art that you will take home.

Lucila Biscione

"Many of my images could have movement, because I take them from a living moment."

http://www.toiartgallery.com/collections/lucila-biscione/products/treffen

What inspires you? Tell us about your working process.

Emotions inspire me; how I perceive different experiences in my life. Drawing is the tool I have to communicate my feelings and thoughts. I look inwards to find images when I’m working. The important thing for me is to look for where these images come from, how did I come to feel this way, what kinds of characters were present at this moment, and in what context did this image develop? Only through observing those moments carefully and being conscious of every detail, as if one was playing the piano, I get inspired.

Lucila Biscione. Toi Art Gallery blog. Artists in Motion

http://www.toiartgallery.com/collections/lucila-biscione

Where do you work? How is your work routine?

Some mornings I go jogging, others I go straight to drawing. Jogging is part of my creative process; I get fill with ideas. Many images appear to me while I’m in motion. I work at home, I spend many hours in solitude, something that I really enjoy. My work is time consuming; there was a time that I used to work fast, but not now.

Lucila Biscione. Artist in Motion. Toi Art Gallery blog

What artists influence you?

Remedios Varo and Leonora Carrington always seemed to me like a double explosion in the history of art. Their friendship, how they came to understand and influence each other, it’s just incredible. Working with paper I like artists like Elsa Mora, Mia Pearlman, and Johanna Willhelm in Buenos Aires… My work is definitely influenced by women.

You were born in Argentina and live in Germany, how does this influence your work?

I feel that moving to Germany saved me. It showed me that if I don’t feel connected there with a reality that I like, there is nothing more, because I return to my center. And this I think is because I moved for love, and evidently there did not exist the possibility that I could be complete artistically without my partner. For this reason, Germany in general inspired me with other times, other fashions, other flavors, other sounds.

Lucila Biscione. Artists in Motion. Toi Art Gallery blog

How did you start your career and why did you choose paper cut as you way of expression?

I studied illustration with someone difficult to describe as an artist: Sylvia Matto. Silvia will be always be my teacher, because she was the person who guided me inside myself, and she taught me the tools to express myself. 

There were many years of sharing a space as very sensible and generous colleagues, from which I learned a great deal, without a doubt. In the middle of this searching and learning, I became clear that neither acrylics, ink, or pencil were going to be my final destiny, because I always felt very clumsy with them.. What I didn't know then is that paper was going to be something so addictive for me.

Your work is wonderfully detailed. What is your philosophy behind this attention to detail?

It’s hard for me to think that something is going to end, and, in some way, I can associate it to my way of working. When I start a draft, I like to feel that I’m going to take my time to work on it, that I don’t have to rush to finish. The details allow me to be focused on a very small portion of the paper for hours. It’s like being hidden in this place.

http://www.toiartgallery.com/collections/lucila-biscione/products/circus-circo

There is something magic in your work: your landscapes, your characters have a feeling of coming from legends or fantastic stories. Could you tell us about this?

One day I asked my mom what I was like when I was a child and she said that the first thing it came to her mind was the image of me sitting by myself, always in the same spot in the house, playing alone, talking to imaginary friends and making up stories for hours.

The day my mother died I had to go to her house to pick the clothes she was going to be dressed in [for her funeral]. When I arrived at her house and went into her room, I suddenly realized two things: first, the meaning of death, and[also] that that in the last 10 years of her life my mom was in her pajamas. I had the sensation that it was ridiculous to want to dress her in street clothes. Anyway, I chose that which I thought she would rest the best and I brought that.

A month later I moved to Berlin, very anguished. One morning I sat down, closed my eyes and searched for a moment that connected me more with the heartache that I was feeling, and then I returned to my mom’s bedroom. My mom was there, and at her side was María, her nurse. When she got up from her bed, I saw that she was wearing the most beautiful robe and pajamas I’d ever seen. Then, some figures came and guided her slowly from the room. I was in a corner of the room, playing the harp. [In reality, I don’t play any instrument, but everyone says that when someone dies, they play the harp. So, I supposed that the instrument appeared because it was suitable to the occasion. These are my stories, my scenarios. My characters exist or have existed and with these images, I am able to disarm the sensation of heartache and turn it into a peaceful feeling. Many of my images could be animated, could have movement, because I take them from a living moment.

http://www.toiartgallery.com/collections/lucila-biscione/products/circus-circo-1

Why should we have art at home?

Because we take home a fragment of the thousands of things we see everyday, and because we can’t take it all with us, we do a more personal selection. One chooses a piece and a specific place for it, and then creates a special relationship with the artwork. Every day you see it again and it reminds you of that relationship, that feeling. A while ago, my friend, artist Eleonora [Arroyo], sent me an email telling me that she bought one of my pieces in a gallery in Buenos Aires. I loved her gesture, I thought it would be so cool to have a blog where people can write about the artwork they buy and what they feel about it, why did they pick them (although it would be tough if they say they got a piece because it matches the sofa! :-)

Toi Art Gallery. Paper-cut Lucila Biscione. Toi Blog

What do scissors represent for you?

Movement.

Toi Art Gallery Blog. Lucila Biscione. Artists in Motion

http://www.toiartgallery.com/collections/lucila-biscione/products/gardener-jardinero

Toi Art Gallery. Lucila Biscione. Artists in Motion. Toi Blog

Lucila Biscione. Toi Art Gallery. Meaningful art for sale

http://www.toiartgallery.com/collections/lucila-biscione

                                                                                                     Karina Miller

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Picture books are books too: The real value of Words and Pictures

Picture books are books too: The real value of Words and Pictures

There is a lot of controversy about the present state of the children’s books market. In fact, both, the optimistic and pessimistic views on the future of children’s literature offer an interesting perspective on the actual world’s zeitgeist, and our society’s idea of childhood.

http://www.toiartgallery.com/collections/mariana-ruiz-johnson

The New York Times published an article, “Picture Books No Longer a Staple for Children” by Julie Bosman (2010) that explores the reasons why picture books sales are dropping. It is astonishing to discover how parents’ ideas about picture books are in fact driven by a bigger fear of ruining children’s future.

Bosman quotes Dara La Porte, manager of the children’s department at the Politics and Prose bookstore in Washington: “I see children pick up picture books, and then the parents say, ‘You can do better than this, you can do more than this.’ It’s a terrible pressure parents are feeling — that somehow, I shouldn’t let my child have this picture book because she won’t get into Harvard.” [NY Times]

http://www.toiartgallery.com/collections/miren-asiain-lora/products/poster-pumpk

But what is it that children are actually missing? They are missing the wonderful and irreplaceable world of childhood.

Picture books are the building blocks that build both a child’s character and a culture. As Ray Bradbury said in a 1993 interview: “You don’t have to burn books to destroy a culture. Just get people to stop reading them.” Bradbury’s phrase seems to suggest that the love for books represents, in fact, a broader and more all-embracing love: that is of humanity, its history and its culture.

 Toi Art Gallery blog

http://www.toiartgallery.com/collections/eleonora-arroyo

We asked different authors and illustrators, what is the importance of picture’s books today? What is the significance of the relationship between words and images, and how do they work together to convey their message?

This is what we learned: these books are essential to develop children’s sensibility, critical thinking, reading habits, imagination and emotional connection with parents and the world. After all, picture books are, first of all, books.

Toi art gallery blog

http://www.toiartgallery.com/collections/cecilia-alfonso-esteves

toi art gallery

http://www.toiartgallery.com/collections/natalia-colombo

Mariana Ruiz Johnson Toi Art Gallery

http://www.toiartgallery.com/collections/mariana-ruiz-johnson

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Interview with Isol Misenta

Toi: How do words and images work together in your books? What place do they have?

Isol: There are two languages, literary and graphic. In my books, together they make the story I want to tell. The main idea of the book comes from that dialogue. I really enjoy the process of finding a way to say what I want to say. I use very few words, [my style is] direct and straightforward, although they might allude to a message that is not so simple. I like to be synthetic. I work with drawings that are expressive and communicate emotions. Drawing lines are very expressive, that’s why they are usually in the foreground in my drawings. Sometimes drawings “mock” the text, sometimes they complete it. It is always an interesting dance.  

 toi art gallery blog

Toi: What kind of stories do you prefer?

Isol: I do not have a favorite genre ... Yes, there are themes that are recurrent in my work, like how we see things that seem for certain, and the identity of things and people. I always approach a story from a strangeness perspective, a distant view of the everyday to re-think critically about cliches and common places.  

toi art gallery

Toi: Do you think that picture books are for kids only?

Isol: Not at all. I am passionate about these books. Of course there are some more interesting than others. I feel that some people have found in picture books a window to enjoying both art and stories, and it is a way to connect generations in an activity that started in prehistoric times. Drawings that evoke stories, desires, fears ...

toi art gallery

*** ~***

Interview with Eleonora Arroyo

Toi: What is the importance of children’s books?

EA: I believe the importance of children’s books is the same as that of adult books. We read books that move us, that widen our horizons, that entertain us; [there are] some that mark us, that make us think, and that we treasure all our lives. Children (and adults) read and start understanding themselves. Reading is a moment of discoveries. The child starts building his or her own interpretations, their own meanings. They connect ideas in a more unprejudiced way than adults. In this way, children build their own imaginary and sensibility.

toi art gallery blog

Toi: How do you see the relationship between words and images?

EA: The illustration begins a conversation with the word, providing a point of view through expressive arguments. Even though sometimes it is necessary to show with the image what the text says, the elements of an image can be totally expressive in their form, color and composition, producing a dialogue and not merely a repetition of the text.

toi art gallery blog

toi gallery blog

http://www.toiartgallery.com/collections/eleonora-arroyo

Toi: What is the role of the picture book in kids' learning process?

EA: Sometimes we are lucky enough to recover a picture book that was much loved in our childhood. The reunion is very touching. In each page, in each illustration we revive sensations of discovery, of belonging, of the enormous pleasure that we felt when we were little readers. This kind of experience is just an example of the importance of the picture book during childhood.

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Interview with Roger Ycaza:

Toi art gallery blog

Toi: What kind of images and narratives interest you?

RY: I try to create images that have rhythm, that present a new reading, that contribute to making readers feel in a certain way, that reach them. Right now I’m working in a new book as an author and illustrator where I try to remember how children used to play, that joy of wanting to share the simplest things.

toi art gallery

Toi: How do you see the future of children’s literature?

RY: I try to be positive always, and so I am confident that children’s literature is going to continue growing more and more, but without overproduction, with stories very well thought-out, very well analyzed; stories that contribute and not just repeat again and again the same themes. I believe that’s going to be the challenge in the future.

toi art gallery blog 

Toi: What kind of picture books do you prefer?

RY: Well, I like all kind, happy stories, nostalgic stories, sensible stories. As I said before, I look for books that move me, that affect me in a certain way, books that I can come back again and again. By the way, I think of children’s books as books for everybody, no matter what age.

toi art gallery blog

toi art gallery blog

 

Isol Misenta: Is an Argentine creator of children’s picture books and a pop singer. For her career contribution to "children's and young adult literature in the broadest sense" she won the Astrid Lindgren Memorial Award from the Swedish Arts Council in 2013, the biggest prize in children's literature

Eleonora Arroyo: Her work has been shown in the Biennale of Bratislava and The Children's Books Argentine Illustrators Fair in Bologna, 2008. Eleonora has illustrated texts by renowned writers such as Juan Gelman, Anton Chekhov and Rubén Darío. In 2012 she was nominated for the IBBY Argentina, Honour List. 

Roger Ycaza: Is an Ecuadorian Artist, he has illustrated more than seventy short stories, children's and youth novels for different publishers. He writes and illustrates his own stories, among which are “Los días raros" Fondo de Cultura Económica ,"Abril y Moncho" (Alfaguara ), "Vueltas por el universo" (Deidayvuelta ) and “Dreams", Alfaguara.  His work has been published in Ecuador, Colombia, Argentina, Mexico, Italy, Spain, Chile, Peru, Guatemala and the United States. He obtained the Fondo de Cultura Economica Award for “At the edge of the wind" in 2014. Roger’s work was selected for the international exhibition "I Colori del Sacro” in The Diocesan Museum di Padova, Italy in 2016. He also obtained the Honorable Mention by Latin America Illustrates, in 2014. He also obtained the Illustration Prize “Guevara Darío Mayorga "in 2014 and 2011.

                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                    Karina Miller 

 

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Stephen Ellcock: The Facebook curator or the social media cabinet of wonders.

Stephen Ellcock: The Facebook curator or the social media cabinet of wonders.

I came across Stephen Ellcock’s Facebook page by accident, or maybe it was destiny, but in any case it was certainly meant to be; with the kind of voyeuristic pleasure Facebook provokes, I notice I wasn’t the first one: many of my “FF” or Facebook friends, already had discovered the treasure.

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